C4SSA

Ceasar Act

The Caesar Syria Civilian Protection Act was signed into law on December 20, 2019 by President Donald Trump. The law sanctions the Syrian government, including President Bahsar al-Assad and members of the Assad regime for enabling war crimes against the Syrian people. One of the main goals of the Caesar Act is to put pressure on the Syrian, Russian, and Iranian governments to agree to a political transition in line with U.N. Security Council Resolution 2254. Under the Caesar Act, the United States will sanction anyone who:

    • knowingly engages in or provides significant financial, material, or technological support to the Government of Syria, its officials or its proxies.
    • Knowingly provides aircraft parts, services or support for military purposes in Syria, in support of the Syrian government or its proxies.  
    • Knowingly supports the Syrian government’s production of natural gas, petroleum or petroleum products.

According to Section 401 of the Caesar Act, the following six requirements must occur for the United States to lift sanctions on Syria, Assad and his accomplices:

      1. End to Syrian and Russian aircraft bombing civilians.
      2. Iranian, Syrian and Russian forces, as well as entities connected to them, no longer restrict humanitarian access to besieged areas and allow for civilians to leave freely.
      3. All political prisoners are released, and the appropriate international human rights organizations are given full access to Syria’s prisons and detention facilities.
      4. Bombing of “medical facilities, schools, residential areas, and community gathering places, including markets” by Syrian, Russian, Iranian forces, as well as entities connected to them, ceases.
      5. The possibility for the “safe, voluntary, and dignified return of Syrians displaced by the conflict” is achieved.
      6. Accountability for “perpetrators of war crimes in Syria and justice for victims of war crimes committed by the Assad regime, including by participation in a credible and independent truth and reconciliation process.”

Ceasar Act

The Caesar Syria Civilian Protection Act was signed into law on December 20, 2019 by President Donald Trump. The law sanctions the Syrian government, including President Bahsar al-Assad and members of the Assad regime for enabling war crimes against the Syrian people. One of the main goals of the Caesar Act is to put pressure on the Syrian, Russian, and Iranian governments to agree to a political transition in line with U.N. Security Council Resolution 2254. Under the Caesar Act, the United States will sanction anyone who:

  • knowingly engages in or provides significant financial, material, or technological support to the Government of Syria, its officials or its proxies.
  • Knowingly provides aircraft parts, services or support for military purposes in Syria, in support of the Syrian government or its proxies.  
  • Knowingly supports the Syrian government’s production of natural gas, petroleum or petroleum products.

According to Section 401 of the Caesar Act, the following six requirements must occur for the United States to lift sanctions on Syria, Assad and his accomplices:

  1. End to Syrian and Russian aircraft bombing civilians.
  2. Iranian, Syrian and Russian forces, as well as entities connected to them, no longer restrict humanitarian access to besieged areas and allow for civilians to leave freely.
  3. All political prisoners are released, and the appropriate international human rights organizations are given full access to Syria’s prisons and detention facilities.
  4. Bombing of “medical facilities, schools, residential areas, and community gathering places, including markets” by Syrian, Russian, Iranian forces, as well as entities connected to them, ceases.
  5. The possibility for the “safe, voluntary, and dignified return of Syrians displaced by the conflict” is achieved.
  6. Accountability for “perpetrators of war crimes in Syria and justice for victims of war crimes committed by the Assad regime, including by participation in a credible and independent truth and reconciliation process.”